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Nandujja fine-tunes her drums for gala

The Planets’ Annet Nandujja of is a singer, composer and dancer, whose performances have often put her in a class of her own. She has won awards here and abroad.

Nandujja earned a reputation as Uganda’s favourite traditional dancer in the 1990s when together with Kiyimba Musisi and Erasmus Ssebunya they formed the group which now has more than 30 members.
In 2003 during George Bush’s visit she entertained the president who was enthralled by the Kiganda dance. In her offices on William Street in Kampala the photos pinned on the wall tell of her achievements.
In one photo she is shaking hands with Bush, in another she is dancing for Kabaka Ronald Muwenda Mutebi.
She was the main entertainer on Godfrey Binaisa’s wedding and has on several occasions entertained President Yoweri Museveni.

But what threw her into the rest of Uganda’s face more than anything else was her promotional song for WBS TV, Eno WBS, which turned out to be more of her own advert than one for Gordon Wavamunno’s TV station.
This Friday together with artistes Mariam Ndagire, Mesach Ssemakula, Haruna Mubiru and others, Nandujja will be at Theatre La Bonita to launch her latest album Endabada in a musical show dubbed Muzaala baaki mu Ndabada.
 
In Endabada, Nandujja teaches ladies how to be decent in public. In one verse she wonders why young ladies display ‘those strings they call knickers’ and why they abandoned the good old ‘mothers union’ panties that were acceptable to everyone.
She does not spare men who wear shorts when their legs look more like dining table stands.

“People should come and witness the talent we have in Uganda as we shall perform all traditional dances in Uganda like Mwaga, Ekizino, Ekitaguriro, Orunyege and Entogoro on top of Kiganda dances like Amagunju and Bakisimba,” Nandujja said.
Don’t come expecting a guitar but, but a drum beat to tunes like Obufumbo bwaleero, Abaami, Essuula, Tulimukuzunga, Etooke, Obunyonyi and Kamungolo among others.

“Nandujja has fought to preserve Uganda’s cultural heritage. She has trained not only traditional dancers but even us; we have performed with her in Sweden, Portugal, UK, Germany, India, Kenya and Tanzania,” said Mariam Ndagire a close friend.
Nandujja’s group won the 2005 PAM Award for best cultural group in Uganda.

abaker@observer.ug

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