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There are many falsehoods and distortions being peddled about the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, 2009 which is before Parliament. One of these is the argument that being ‘gay’ is a human right and therefore the bill criminalises people’s liberty.
Uganda has been vilified as a violator of people’s rights by ‘rights activists’ and the international media that have distorted debate about the ‘David Bahati Bill’. This skewed reporting has courted outrage from world leaders and countries who have voiced opposition to the bill.

I hope Ugandans note the hypocrisy at play. How come these world leaders never reacted angrily when Joseph Kony was butchering Ugandans?

People peddling homosexuality as a right should tell us when it became a right. Since this debate is now universal, I will refer to key international human rights instruments which are the basis of civil liberties in constitutions of most countries, including Uganda.

The December 10, 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the UN General Assembly clearly states that marriage is meant for people of opposite sexes.
It says in article 16 (a): “Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion have a right to marry and to found a family.”

It goes on to defend the family institution which is the stated objective of the Bahati Bill when it says in 16 (c): “The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the state.”

In lobbying for rights of widows and special care for mothers and children, the proclamation leaves no doubt that sexual relations are meant to be between man and woman.

The 1789 French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens also doesn’t classify same sex relations as a right. The timing of the Bahati Bill has also been questioned by people like FDC Publicist Wafula Oguttu, who pitifully argues that the bill targets the opposition ahead of the 2011 polls!

If previous bills, like the recently passed Land Bill were enacted without concerns of timing, then Wafula’s doubts (I mention Wafula because many FDC MPs have voiced support for the bill) would be surprising. There has also been an attempt to lower the importance of the bill. Questions have been asked as to whether homosexuality is the most urgent challenge affecting Ugandans.

This is the very essence of a pluralist society with diverse organisations pursuing different interests hence existence of groups like anti-corruption, environment, human rights and women activists.

We should spare anti-gay activists this undeserved assault in the same way we shouldn’t fault people like Wafula Oguttu and his ilk for making anti-Museveni campaigns the basis for their existence.

Those accusing us of supporting legislation on bedroom affairs should direct that issue to the minority gays who brought their vice from their bedrooms to press conferences, demonstrations, school campuses and gay festivities where they recruit members.

In fact, this is my major discomfort with homosexuality - it is not emerging naturally but rather as a result of intense campaigns in schools, luring people with money and all sorts of falsehoods.

In June 2009, I wrote in The Observer how the Ministry of Education was struggling to withdraw a UNICEF book, “Teenager’s Tool Kit” in primary schools that tells pupils that “Many people are sexually attracted to people of the same sex…we are born with these feelings about who we like sexually.”

Gays target other people’s children because they don’t have their own to enlist.
Advocates of homosexuality should think about the broader impact of their crusade. Homosexuality destroys man’s capacity for procreation, the taste of human life and eventually life itself. Truths should also be told that even in America, there is no consensus over gay rights. In fact, in most states that have legalised it, it has been through court rulings, not out of a popular vote.

We can debate some of the provisions and penalties in the Bahati Bill but we should be mindful not to make it toothless compared to the Penal Code (section 145 (c)) that already provides for life imprisonment for homosexuals. Making a toothless law will be counterproductive because laws are meant to be punitive and deterrent in nature.

The author is a Staff Reporter with The Observer.

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Comments

 
0 #1 MABO 2010-01-11 10:58
This is a good article targeting to dispel the propaganda tide by gays & their "liberal" minded proponents! The mere fact tht gays deliberately entice & recruit our kids into the vice then hide under "rights" makes me clentch my teeth! The misinformation they peddle tht gayism is a right is also sickening! Should they use their hypered rights to distort our families? Its suprising to hear tht htey even intend to adopt children! The hypocracy of these whites is also nagging us now! How come in their own countries gays still demand for attention? Some ugandan elites ahve also jumped on the wagon of the west,amy be to justfy the visas & scholarships they benefit from them! I wish we had a "good" gay who could sodomise their won kids so tht we can hear their own reaction! My final submission is tht come wht may,we in uganda don't need gays,we shall battle them even if it means crawling on our knees & bellies we shall do it. At least the ugandan motto guides/inspires me to do so! I rest my case. For God & my country.
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0 #2 Dora 2010-01-11 11:41
This is good stuff. The gays recruit new members in schools especially, which would not be necessary if they were born gay like they want us to believe,
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0 #3 Jespa 2010-01-11 14:15
You are right Mubangizi !

If you vist some gay blogs , you see the devils boasting obout how they have used a lot of tactics to knock down the bill . One of those tactics is to contact sevelal inti- Museveni or anti- Relligion people and use them in their campain . They have lied and spinned . Poor fellows like Wafula Ogutu think that by opposing the bill , they are in fighting Museveni . They have no idea that what they are doing is actually helping Museveni to look like the reasonable one . Museveni is no fool ; he has already made a move , by sending reconcilliatory tones as if he too is on the side of these homosexuals . At end of the day ,there will be a strong law against the practice or the spreading of homosexuality . The homosexuals will then wish they had kept their persversion in the closet .
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0 #4 Eric L. 2010-01-12 05:53
Thanks.I have never understood the claim of gayism being a human right.

These same wazungu have never seen polygamy as a right.The act is non-African,non-constitutional nor Biblical.Let them retain ALL their aid if its the condition for the bill.China is itching to give aid yet without sodomising anybody.

Thats the reason I hate Politics.Its about opposing ALL your rival's innovations without thinking.

I can only ask for a change in the punishment of the culprits to suit Biblical teachings.Those ready to confess and live normal should be given a chance and they should be kept separately in Prisons otherwise they may teach and sodomise others as a strategy.
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0 #5 martin 2010-01-12 06:49
A Ugandan man I usually slaps his wife shoves her around. When people ask him why he is persecuting
his wife , he responds that this is a private domestic affair, his father did the same and so did his grandfather besides he paid bride price for her she is his wife and he can do as he pleases. Word gets to his employer who calls him in and cautions him telling him the company does not want to be associated with a wife beater. The man complains that he is being blackmailed and that he has consulted with his clan elders and clans men and they all agree that his actions are alright and that his employer should keep out of his private life. Is this man right?
Sex is for adults do hetrosexuals target schools???
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0 #6 solomon 2010-01-12 06:53
just like people with hiv
some homos want to tell you that they are homos. others do NOT
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+1 #7 Emma Cooper 2010-01-12 19:21
It really scares me that these responses are totally serious.
When the gay teenagers in Uganda end up taking their own lives because of the horrendous conditions they are forced to be subject to, I hope you are proud, especially if they are your own children and you have driven them to such a level of self hatred and anger. You should be ashamed.

You should also learn to spell.
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+1 #8 Ricky SA 2010-01-13 11:54
Dear Mr. Mubangizi,
The question is NOT whether homosexuality is a right but whether homoseual people should have the same rights as everyone else.

The Ugandan Constitution (and the various international instruments that binds Uganda) contains certain rights that are for everyone, irrespective of sexuality, religion, age, hair color etc.

No matter what you might think of homosexuality from a moral, religious or other perspective, certain rights are guaranteed for everyone - and the so-called Anti-Homosexuality Bill violates many of these rights.

What is the basis for your statement that homoseuxuality "is not emerging naturally but rather as a result of intense campaigns in schools" etc?

With respect to the USA, you are confusing the legalisation of homosexual relations and the rights for homosexuals to marry. Homosexuals are entitled to have sex, live together etc. in all states in the USA - but may only legally marry in a few (but unlike in Malawi etc.

they are entitled to have as many marriage ceremonies as they like (could be considered protected by the freedom of expression) in each and every state even if this has no legal implications in most states).

You still have not explained what makes this Act necessary now - if you are only afraid of kids being sodomised etc, then target that in laws, this is not the same as private acts between consenting adults.
Finally, your last sentence that "laws are meant to be punitive and deterrent in nature" is utter nonsense. You seem to be confusing ordinary laws with penal codes.
Regards
Ricky SA
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+1 #9 Ricky SA 2010-01-13 12:01
Dear Mr. Mubangizi,
The question is NOT whether homosexuality is a right but whether homoseual people should have the same rights as everyone else. The Ugandan Constitution (and the various international instruments that binds Uganda) contains certain rights that are for everyone, irrespective of sexuality, religion, age, hair color etc. No matter what you might think of homosexuality from a moral, religious or other perspective, certain rights are guaranteed for everyone - and the so-called Anti-Homosexuality Bill violates many of these rights.
What is the basis for your statement that homoseuxuality "is not emerging naturally but rather as a result of intense campaigns in schools" etc?
With respect to the USA, you are confusing the legalisation of homosexual relations and the rights for homosexuals to marry. Homosexuals are entitled to have sex, live together etc. in all states in the USA - but may only legally marry in a few (but unlike in Malawi etc. they are entitled to have as many marriage ceremonies as they like (could be considered protected by the freedom of expression) in each and every state even if this has no legal implications in most states).
You still have not explained what makes this Act necessary now - if you are only afraid of kids being sodomised etc, then target that in laws, this is not the same as private acts between consenting adults.
Finally, your last sentence that "laws are meant to be punitive and deterrent in nature" is utter nonsense. You seem to be confusing ordinary laws with penal codes.
Regards
Ricky SA
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+1 #10 Rev Amos Kasibante 2010-01-13 16:38
Is it true as Mr Mubangizi states that world leaders never reacted angrily when Kony was killing people in northern Uganda(or DRCongo)?

Has Mr Mubangizi allowed sentimentality to cloud both his reporting and his memory? What was the case of the International Criminal Court about otherwise?

There's a question regarding reports of concerted recruitment of children in schools into homosexual activity.

As a journalist, Mr Mubangizi should name some schools and the names of individuals engaged in this recruitment.

He should also ask if the recruitment drive is an intense as we are made to believe, why the recruiters have not been apprehended by the school authorities or the police? Are the school authorities and the police complicit?
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