Uganda has decided to pull out of all its international peacekeeping missions in DR Congo, Somalia and Central African Republic (CAR).

 

The “irreversible” decision comes a few weeks after a UN leaked report accused Uganda and its neighbour Rwanda of supporting and financing the M23 rebels in DR Congo. Both countries have categorically denied the allegations, more so Uganda.

Security minister Muruli Mukasa said at the Media Centre on Friday: “We have proposed to the United Nations that we want to withdraw our forces from the Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Somalia in order to concentrate on our own security.”

The explanation of concentrating on own security is obviously to put it diplomatically as another minister, Asuman Kiyingi, had already been quoted in an interview with BBC that Uganda would withdraw from these missions in retaliation over the report.

Indeed the minister later added: “Why do people want to tarnish our name? After all the sacrifices we have made to help our neighbours and ensure there is stability in the region. Therefore, let us watch our country and make sure there is enough security… Whoever wants to cause us trouble will have to find us in our country.”

Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi yesterday told Parliament that Uganda would withdraw her troops from international duties because her peacekeeping and stabilisation efforts had not been recognised but rather questioned by the UN report.

According to Lt. Gen. Katumba Wamala, the UPDF land forces commander, Uganda has since 2007 contributed at least 6,332 soldiers to the UN and African Union-backed peace mission in Somalia to combat al-Shabab insurgents. Relative peace has since been restored in the country. When the Ugandans arrived in 2007, they were only in control of a few blocks in Mogadishu but today most of the urban areas in Somalia are in government hands thanks to the effort.

As for the Central African Republic, the UPDF backed by the United States went into the country in pursuit against the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) who fled there after being defeated in northern Uganda. Eventually, a UN-backed force including Uganda and other regional armies was created to continue the pursuit and eliminate the LRA threat.

Comments

-1 #21 A K Mukasa 2012-11-03 17:41
I am a bit confused by the reaction! Did Museveni send troops to Somalia to help the UN or was it done to help Somalia and its beleaguered people. The reaction is very juvenile and cynical.

If there is evidence of serious mischief should this be disregarded merely to avoid offending him? I think it is time to remind Museveni that impunity only applies in Uganda.
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0 #22 DAVID 2012-11-04 01:06
Betty Long Whatever

You're just spewing sheer nonsense and crap. You seem to be getting what you're writing from the clouds. I even wonder where you get that crass talk of a coup!. Do you think that the Uganda of 2010s is the same as that of the 1970s to the mid 1980s?

You even sound like a ninny when you say that the African troops deployed outside their territories are "mercenaries"!, what can you say about the US that has sent her troops throughout the globe to export terror particularly in the Middle East?

Unlike the UPDF that has stabilised Rwanda, South Sudan and Somalia (which the 'mighty' US failed in the early 1990s!), have you forgotten the indelible mark the US has caused in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya?.

Can you imagine that in countries like Libya, the same US government assisted some of the groups blacklisted by her state department as terrorist organisations to attain power?!. What a contradiction?!
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-1 #23 Betty Long Cap 2012-11-04 03:15
Quoting DAVID:
I even wonder where you get that crass talk of a coup!.


Museveni reveals coup d'etat fears
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 00:05
Written by DAVID TASH LUMU & SULAIMAN KAKAIRE
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-1 #24 Betty Long Cap 2012-11-04 03:43
Quoting DAVID:
You even sound like a ninny....


In my country ninny is a racial slur.

Pickaninny (also picaninny or piccaninny) is a term in English which refers to children of black descent or a racial caricature thereof. It is a pidgin word form, which may be derived from the Portuguese pequenino[1] (an affectionate term derived from pequeno, "little").

In the Creole English of Surinam the word for a child is pikin ningre (li. "small negro"). The term pickaninny has also been used in the past to describe aboriginal Australians.

[2] According to Robin Bernstein who describes the meaning in the context of the United States, the pickaninny is characterized by three qualities: "the figure is always juvenile, always of color, and always resistant if not immune to pain.".[3] At one time the word may have been used as a term of affection, but it is now considered derogatory.[4]
wikipedia.com
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0 #25 Obalopiny 2012-11-04 08:25
how can a warmonger be a peace maker at the same time? It is the wrong choice in the first place for the UN to be partnering with Uganda on peace because of Ugandan army's appalling human rights record in neighboring countries and even in Uganda it's self.

Only in 2005 the UN court fined Uganda $10, 000, 000, 000 (unpaid) for plundering the DRC when Uganda invaded between 1993-2004. Uganda committed crimes against humanity (torture, rapes, recruitment of child soldiers, genocides etc) during the illegal occupation of the DRC resulting in the unnecessary death of over six million civilians.

The UN and the international community has strangely never punished Uganda for its crimes in the DRC which is just as grave as NAZI crimes during "world war II". There are over 100 member nations of the UN. It would be ideal for the UN's image to find better partners for peace than Uganda, so the UN should not be blackmailed by Uganda.
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-1 #26 Obalopiny 2012-11-04 08:26
If Uganda wants to pull out of peace keeping programs it should be seen as a blessing in disguise.
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0 #27 DAVID 2012-11-04 15:58
Quoting Betty Long Cap:
Quoting DAVID:
I even wonder where you get that crass talk of a coup!.


Museveni reveals coup d'etat fears
Wednesday, 19 September 2012 00:05
Written by DAVID TASH LUMU & SULAIMAN KAKAIRE


Whether true or false, did he purportedly express those fears in the context of the UPDF deployment in Somalia?
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0 #28 DAVID 2012-11-04 16:09
Cap Betty Long

Have you bothered to check for the meaning of the word, "rascal", which you constantly use to refer to our beloved CIC, Ssabalwanyi, the visionary leader, General, fountain of honour etc etc?.
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-1 #29 Betty Long Cap 2012-11-04 17:54
Quoting DAVID:
Have you bothered to check for the meaning of the word, "rascal", which you constantly use....


Oust the rascal is an expression used by Professor Kenneth P Vickery in his series The African Experience; from "Lucy" to Mandela. Uganda is one of serveral African nations with dictators who overstayed. The solution in every case is to oust the rascal.
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-1 #30 Betty Long Cap 2012-11-04 18:02
Quoting DAVID:
[... did he purportedly express those fears in the context of the UPDF ...?


Fear of a coup d'etat is the occupational hazard of every dictator. Uganda's dictator is a realist and he knows sooner or later his bubble will burst.

A coup d'etat can be triggered by the military, hungry peasants, and/or the dissidents of a country.
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-1 #31 DAVID 2012-11-04 21:11
Quoting Betty Long Cap:
Quoting DAVID:
Have you bothered to check for the meaning of the word, "rascal", which you constantly use....


Oust the rascal is an expression used by Professor Kenneth P Vickery in his series The African Experience; from "Lucy" to Mandela. Uganda is one of serveral African nations with dictators who overstayed. The solution in every case is to oust the rascal.


Stop your hypocrisy and double standards. Why don't you call for the ousting of 'rascals' that have caused internal sufferage in the Middle East, that are moreover in your backyard?.

Apart from a few goons that are hell bent on causing mayhem, having you seen a large number of Ugandans pouring on the streets complaining about the 'overstay' of their leader?. FYI, M7 is still loved and revered by most Ugandans. Keep your 'overstay' talk to yourself.
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0 #32 DAVID 2012-11-04 21:26
Quoting Betty Long Cap:
Quoting DAVID:
[... did he purportedly express those fears in the context of the UPDF ...?


Fear of a coup d'etat is the occupational hazard of every dictator. Uganda's dictator is a realist and he knows sooner or later his bubble will burst.

A coup d'etat can be triggered by the military, hungry peasants, and/or the dissidents of a country.


Well you're still leaving in the past. Coups are an issue of the cold war. Since you're playing your doomsday politics afar, you should be forgiven for your crass talk because you're even not in touch with the reality on the ground.

Ignorant as you're, you seem to be unaware that the backbone of the NRM is the military and the peasants. As for the dissidents, they've previously tried all avenues and failed hence their fading into oblivion. Its your humanright to continue daydreaming.
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0 #33 Betty Long Cap 2012-11-04 22:10
Quoting DAVID:
FYI, M7 is still loved and revered by most Ugandans. Keep your 'overstay' talk to yourself.


Dictators thrive on illusion they are loved until that final moment when they stand alone. There are other charges against your DICTATOR but the strongest, undeniable case is twenty six years and still counting.

NEVER AGAIN.
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